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5 Trade-Offs to Consider When Remodeling Your Kitchen

By: Moorea Hoffman 

It would be great to have an unlimited budget for a kitchen renovation. But the fact is most of us do not. And that’s OK. Compromises of one form or another are part of the process, even for the rare homeowner who enjoys a bottomless budget and expansive square footage. 

But how, exactly, do you decide between two compelling options with different pros and cons? The most critical tool to have on hand to help you make tough choices is a clear picture of your remodel goals. To get clarity on what matters most to you, read about some key trade-offs you and your kitchen designer will consider during your project.


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How Will You Use Your Kitchen? 

When planning a kitchen remodel yourself or with a kitchen designer, you want to be very clear on how you want to use your new kitchen. Here is one example: I want to have people over more often. I want to feel relaxed when I entertain. In order to feel relaxed, I need to make sure that no one is in my way while I cook. I also want my kitchen to stay neat during the cooking process and be laid out so that cleaning up will be efficient.

Clear goals can help homeowners make decisions and, as the budget nears its limit, ultimately choose the options that will best support their goals. What matters most to you in a kitchen?


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1. Daily Use vs. Special Events

This area of consideration has to do with how many people your kitchen will serve. From refrigerator storage to seats at the dining table, the number of people you want to accommodate will affect your design choices. You’ll want to consider not only how many people live in the home now, but — if this is your forever home — how many will live in it 10 years from now. Also, how often do you entertain and for how many people? 

I had a client who was retired and cooked only for herself and her husband most days. She entertained just four times a year, on holidays. At first, I was a bit baffled by her choice of a 36-inch range, double ovens and a 48-inch-wide refrigerator. But for her, these choices made sense. 

As the matriarch of a large family, on those four holidays she cooked for 25 to 30 people and had at least two or three people helping her in the kitchen. It was important to her that we designed a flexible space that worked just as well when cooking for two as for 30. 

That approach is a good one: Whenever possible, I recommend that clients design with their maximum capacity needs in mind.


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2. Cost vs. Value

As you may have discovered if you’re considering a remodel (or in the midst of one), everything from cabinets to sinks to appliances comes at a variety of price points. How do you decide when it’s worth it to splurge for a high-quality item and when it’s best to save your dollars? Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Will the investment improve your everyday life?

  • Will the product solve a pet peeve?

  • Will the addition of this element make your house feel like a home?

  • Will the purchase increase the value of your home?

In each of these cases, you may decide that the cost of a feature for your new kitchen is worth it because of the value it brings. For example, a better dishwasher might eliminate the need to prerinse dishes. 

Perhaps you hate scrubbing dishes, can afford an upgrade and would cherish any minute of spare time away from the sink. Or perhaps you feel quite the opposite: You don’t mind scrubbing dishes at all, and this investment wouldn’t be worth the pennies spent. 

Framing your choices as cost vs. value — in terms of your experience in your kitchen, and possibly the resale value of your home — can help you get clarity on what’s worth the extra money.


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One helpful way to prioritize your desires is to analyze the frequency and duration of a given task. Tasks you do frequently or spend more time on should get more weight as you consider what is worth investing in. 

For example, most people use the burners to cook 80 percent of the time, the oven 20 percent of the time. If this applies to you, I recommend prioritizing the cooktop as opposed to the wall oven, both in terms of placement in your kitchen and quality of product. You wouldn’t want to give up a great burner feature to get a fancier oven. 

On the other hand, if you are a frequent baker but rarely use the stovetop, you may prefer to invest in wall ovens rather than spend your budget on a fancy range. For you, it would be better to make sure that reaching into the oven is more ergonomic — done while standing upright, rather than bending over.


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3. Function vs. Aesthetics
Ideally a kitchen redesign brings both beauty and function, but when we are dealing with limited funds, trade-offs between functionality and aesthetics may be necessary. By function, I mean not only the kinds of bells and whistles you get with high-end appliances, but also the kitchen’s layout and the choice of whether to have one sink or two. 

Aesthetics, of course, are the expensive but gorgeous finishes and customized detailing that bring a high-end look to a kitchen. Quite often, a budget may force you to make choices on what matters most to you — the functionality or the look. 

This area of trade-off is deeply personal and has a lot to do with your lifestyle. When weighing aesthetics vs. function, you’ll want to consider everything I mentioned before: how many people you cook for daily, how often you entertain, the kind of entertaining you do (backyard barbecues vs. sit-down dinners), the style of cooking you prefer and how many people work in the kitchen at one time. 

For example, a client who doesn’t do a lot of cooking and is more concerned with the kitchen’s look than its function might really want a beautiful built-in fridge with custom panels but be willing to use a less expensive range or counter material to have that pricey, beautiful fridge. 

On the other hand, I have had several clients (including the owners of the kitchen in this photo) who chose a free-standing fridge and put their budget into the plumbing and construction work required to add a second sink. To me, this is a significant functional improvement and, for those who enjoy cooking and entertaining, worth scaling back on some of the aesthetic details. 

There are many ways you can cut back on aesthetics to create room in your budget for what’s important to you functionally. You might consider a simpler, less expensive door style on the cabinets, or a ceramic backsplash tile instead of glass, or quartz counters instead of granite. 

I even had one client use a very inexpensive laminate counter so that she could put more money into the remodel work necessary to get the layout just right. Since she was in her forever home, she replaced the laminate with a beautiful stone two years later when finances allowed.


4. Speed vs. Patience

Any home improvement project takes time — that’s just part of the process. And once the kitchen is demolished and construction is underway, any delay can be difficult, particularly if you are living in the home and dealing with the mess. When you are in that situation, the risk is that you will be tempted to say yes to anything just to get the project done and your home back to normal. 

This happened with one of my clients, who decided to use a second-choice backsplash because it was in stock, whereas her first choice had a month lead time. On the other hand, a different client had trouble finding a backsplash tile she liked, so she finished her kitchen and skipped the backsplash altogether. Three months later, she found the perfect tile and brought the tile installer back. I am sure you can guess which homeowner was more happy with her kitchen remodel.

When making a large financial investment that you are going to live with a long time, I recommend that you go slowly, taking the time to find the right people to help and weighing your decisions carefully. 

That being said, speed can be a necessary evil. Perhaps you are remodeling for a special event, such as a backyard wedding. Or maybe you are planning to sell the house and just want a quick face-lift to get the most out of your investment. 

As a guide when weighing the need for speed vs. the need to exercise your patience muscles, I recommend you consider how long you plan to live in your home. If you’re going to sell within five years, keep in mind that everything doesn’t have to be perfect — you simply want to be sure you will get your investment back when you sell. However, if you plan to live in the home for 10 years or more, it’s worth slowing down and investing in your quality of life. Take the time to find the right solution, not the quick one. 


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5. The Ideal Me vs. the Real Me
This one isn’t so much a trade-off as a reality check. It’s worth mentioning that some clients have fantasies that a remodel can change their habits — or even their personalities. But my observation has been that if you are already a messy cook, the chances of a new kitchen transforming you into a clean-as-you-go type are pretty slim. 

Rather than plan a kitchen for the person you wish you were, focus on solutions that take your true habits into account. For example, a messy cook who is embarrassed when guests are around might want to add a separate cleanup sink where he can hide dirty dishes while making a meal. 

Or, if clutter is a constant problem, a homeowner might want to create a hidden drop zone for papers, cellphones, pens and other detritus that kitchen counters tend to attract.


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Strategies to Create Color Flow Throughout a Home

Originality and creativity are having a moment: eclectic, colorful spaces are all the rage. But though many are over matchy-matchy furniture and one-size-fits-all paint colors, some consistency throughout the home isn’t a bad thing. Done right, color coordinating leads to better flow and a polished, cohesive interior design. 

Model-home interior designer Mary DeWalt from Austin, Texas; creates designs to appeal to buyers, and one of the ways she does does that is by maintaining color flow throughout. “For us, picking colors is all about memory,” she says. “People are more likely to remember a home with a particular color scheme, because it’s different from all the rest. If buyers are looking at several homes, that all-turquoise one will stand out in their minds.”

DeWalt’s savvy color-coordinating strategies can help turn a disjointed, choppy sauce into a flowing thought-out masterpiece, as this model home design demonstrates. Pick and choose the ideas that might work for you, too.

Photo: Colorful House in Portland via Flickr

As you make your color choices, go with what you love, not just what is trendy. DeWalt suggests picking one neutral and two accent colors to carry throughout every room. Accessories provide the color in rooms with neutral walls and grouping accessories in threes keeps tabletops interesting yet clutter free. 

Not every room needs to include every color. Cohesion is key, but that doesn’t mean you can’t experiment with materials. When accessories aren’t enough, add a wow factor, or what DeWalt calls a punctuation mark. 

Even if you love your color scheme, be cautious with big purchases. “Don’t commit to large, colorful furniture, because if you get tired of the color, it is much more expensive to replace,” DeWalt says. Game rooms and kids’ rooms are great spaces to take chances in; consider going bold with a brightly painted ceiling. In a transitional room, such as a hallway or an entryway, don’t feel the need to go big with color just a hint of your palette can be enough. 

Don’t limit your color scheme to the interior – bring it to your pool or patio with matching tile. For those whose budget doesn’t include a pool renovation (or even a pool), something as simple as colorful outdoor cushions can ensure that your outdoor and indoor spaces pair perfectly.

Strategies to Create Color Flow Throughout a Home – a Case Study

Originality and creativity are having a moment: eclectic, colorful spaces are all the rage. But though many are over matchy-matchy furniture and one-size-fits-all paint colors, some consistency throughout the home isn’t a bad thing. Done right, color coordinating leads to better flow and a polished, cohesive interior design. 

Model-home interior designer Mary DeWalt from Austin, Texas; creates designs to appeal to buyers, and one of the ways she does does that is by maintaining color flow throughout. “For us, picking colors is all about memory,” she says. “People are more likely to remember a home with a particular color scheme, because it’s different from all the rest. If buyers are looking at several homes, that all-turquoise one will stand out in their minds.”

DeWalt’s savvy color-coordinating strategies can help turn a disjointed, choppy sauce into a flowing thought-out masterpiece, as this model home design demonstrates. Pick and choose the ideas that might work for you, too.

 Photo: Colorful House in Portland via Flickr

As you make your color choices, go with what you love, not just what is trendy. DeWalt suggests picking one neutral and two accent colors to carry throughout every room. Accessories provide the color in rooms with neutral walls and grouping accessories in threes keeps tabletops interesting yet clutter free. 

Not every room needs to include every color. Cohesion is key, but that doesn’t mean you can’t experiment with materials. When accessories aren’t enough, add a wow factor, or what DeWalt calls a punctuation mark. 

Even if you love your color scheme, be cautious with big purchases. “Don’t commit to large, colorful furniture, because if you get tired of the color, it is much more expensive to replace,” DeWalt says. Game rooms and kids’ rooms are great spaces to take chances in; consider going bold with a brightly painted ceiling. In a transitional room, such as a hallway or an entryway, don’t feel the need to go big with color just a hint of your palette can be enough. 

Don’t limit your color scheme to the interior – bring it to your pool or patio with matching tile. For those whose budget doesn’t include a pool renovation (or even a pool), something as simple as colorful outdoor cushions can ensure that your outdoor and indoor spaces pair perfectly.

(You are reading an article orginally posted on Houzz)

10 Big Solutions for Small Spaces

From striped floors in the living room to open shelves in the kitchen, designers share their best tricks for tiny rooms. 

Photo: Ngoc Minh Ngo via House Beautiful

#1 Mix Low and Tall Furniture

In any small space, it’s important to not feel boxed in. In this Chicago apartment by architectural consultants Richard Bories and James Shearron, a low credenza is a smart substitute for the obligatory tall bookshelf, which would have closed off the space. “It’s very effective to keep things low and punctuate with verticals here and there,” says Shearron.


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Photo: Ngoc Minh Ngo via House Beautiful

#2 Dare to Be Dramatic

Small spaces are perfect for bold decorating because they require less time, money and materials. “In small, modern apartments you have to create dramatic moments that offset the lack of detail – but don’t hog the space,” says Shearron, who helped chose Benjamin Moore Bright Yellow paint for the apartment’s front door. “Bold, graphic gestures like that look cool in small spaces,” he explains. 


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Photo: Bjorm Wallander via House Beautiful

#3 Choose Side Chairs

Chairs without arms are perfect for small spaces because they’re much easier to get in and out of. They’re also more lightweight. In this 295-square-foot Brooklyn studio, designer Nick Olsen chose a mismatched pair that can effortlessly be moved around the room to wherever they’re needed. 


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Photo: Bjom Wallander via House Beautiful

#4 Don’t Compromise… Everything

Even though space may be tight, don’t settle on what’s important to you. Though this apartment is just one room, the bed is centered in the room rather than pushed against the wall. “But you have to pick your moments. It’s a full size, not a queen,” says Olsen. “She has a love seat instead of a sofa.”


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Photo: Thomas Loof via House Beautiful

#5 Create Distinct Zones

“If a space in monotone, it’s going to feel like one undefined space; if you create distinctions in the space, it feels larger,” says designer Maureen Footer. To make her New York City studio feel larger, she divided up the space by function. A Persian rug sets off the entry while a bookcase helps to define the office area.


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Photo: Thomas Loof via House Beautiful

#6 Hang Curtains at the Ceiling

Vertical lines help create the illusion of height. By hanging curtains directly underneath the crown molding, Footer made the apartment’s low ceilings seem higher and the whole space fell airier.


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Photo: Victoria Pearson via House Beautiful

#7 Install Open Kitchen Shelves

Traditional upper cabinets can close off a kitchen. By in stalling open shelves, designer Chris Barrett made her small California kitchen seem more open. “Wall cabinets are utliltarian but so dull. I love having open shelves and being able to stack pretty dishes and paintings on them,” she says.


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Photo: Victoria Pearson via House Beautiful

#8 Choose Furniture with Curves

Forget about furniture with sharp, pointy corners. For tight corners or narrow hallways, Barrett recommends curved furniture that can easily be walked around.


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Photo: Simon Watson via House Beautiful

#9 Elongate a Space with Stripes

Create the illusion of length by playing with pattern. In architect Bill Ingram’s 1,400-square-foot Alabama cottage, thick and narrow stripes are painted over the stained wood floors. He then used furniture that’s up on legs, so the continuation of the lines are visible under chairs and tables. 


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Photo: Simon Watson via House Beautiful

#10 Install Glass Doors

Ingram also used lots of glass doors – even on closets – to “extend views and add sparkle” throughout the home. It’s a smart way to carry light into dark storage spaces. 

(You are reading an article originally posted on House Beautiful)

Choose Paint Colors With a Color Wheel

Color Wheel Guide


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Photo: The Color Wheel Co.

Picking out paint colors can be a confusing experience, leaving you racked with indecision as you peruse swatches from paint companies intent on re-creating all of the 7 million colors distinguishable to the human eye. Trying to figure out which of those colors will mix harmoniously on your living room wall is enough to make you turn straight to the ecru-and-eggshell-white family and never leave.

One way to go, however, is to use a complementary color scheme. Proving the rule that opposites attract, these pairings can always be found at opposite ends from each other on a paint color wheel. When put together, they bring out the best in each other, making both colors look cleaner and brighter than if either were mixed with, say, a neutral gray or a different shade of the same hue.

An essential tool for paint pros everywhere, the color wheel is constructed to help you see the relationships between different hues. The bases are thre primary colors: red, blue and yellow. These are then combined to make the three secondary colors: orange, green, and purple. Finally, the remaining six colors on the wheel are known as tertiary colors and are mixes of the secondary colors, including such hues as red-orange and blue-green.

Familiarizing yourself with the color wheel can help you understand how to best mix and match a cool color with a warm one, for a naturally balanced room. Here are some examples of how to use these color pairings effectively.


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Photo: Deborah Whitlaw-Llewellyn

Complements: Red and Green

When considering paint colors, remember to figure in the finish of any woodwork in the room. In this rustic Colonial-style kitchen, the green hues brushed onto the walls and lower cabinets complement the red tones of the mahogany beadboard and upper cabinets. 


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Photo: Mark Lund

Complements: Red-Orange and Blue-Green

The two colors you choose don’t have to have equal prominence in the room to work. You can use one as the main color as an accent, or bring small colored accessories into an already painted room to see how you feel about the pairing. Here, the energetically bright orange-red towel and glass pop against the cool, blue-green walls without overwhelming the soothing hue.


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Photo: Laura Moss

Complements: Orange and Blue

Keep the furniture you already have in mind when considering a new paint color. The cool blue milk paint on this wall accentuates the bright burst of orange on the blank chest in front of it – a scheme echoed in a more muted fashion in the bedroom rug beyond the doorway.


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Photo: Laura Moss

Complements: Yellow-Orange and Blue-Violet

Bright colors can breathe new life into traditional woodwork and work especially well in casual living areas. Here, glossy violet-blue pantry doors in a mudroom pop against the yellow-orange of the adjacent wall. When working with more saturated hues, remember that the colors will often appear more intense on the walls than they do on the strip. 


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Photo: Laura Moss

Complements: Yellow and Violet

If you’re a bit timid about suddenly splashing a couple of cans of color onto your walls, consider using two complementary colors as accents in the same room. In this 1950s kitchen the yellow window casing and violet countertop show nicely against the neutral beadboard and white cabinets. 


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Photo: Gregg Segal

Complements: Yellow-Green and Red-Violet

Make sure the intensities of the tones you use are balanced. In this kitchen, the pale yellow-green trim and pantry door meet their match in the subdued reddish-violet paint on the walls. 

Nine Whimsical Touches to Wake Up the Garden

If the August heat is wilting your enthusiasm, try these playful ideas to jump-start your gardening moxie

As the August heat starts to wilt everything outdoors, ask yourself how you feel about this season’s garden. Do you love every inch of it, or does all of that dead headed, pruned perfection leave you wanting more? It’s time to have some fun in the garden, and this is the perfect time to start playing around and planning for next year.

September is a great time to plant new trees, shrubs, and fall bulbs, and as everything starts to wither on the vine, you can spend your time painting the shed, building window boxes, adding trellises, bringing in a statue, changing up the plan, putting out birdseed in funky feeders and scooping up outdoor furniture and decor on clearance. Here are nine fun elements that will get your gardening mojo flowing again.

#1 Vertical Delights: today’s vertical gardens can take on all sorts of graphic designs. You can even create a sign, a painterly composition or spell out a monogram with plants on the wall.

#2 Cutouts: heart shapes entice visitors to pass through your garden doors.

#3 Unexpected Color

#4 Sneak a Design into the Plan View

#5 Wall Planters: classical statuary plantings with Medusa-like ‘dos made of succulents bring a giggle to a fence or wall

#6 Birdhouse Villages: the only thing more fun than a single birdhouse is a swinging singles birdhouse community.

#7 Embellish the Shed: you can go over the top with a shed in a way you can’t on the main house. Have some fun with color and accents such as barn stars, window boxes, trellises and climbing vines. 

#8 Surprising Scale: oversize items become eye-catchers when placed strategically in the garden.

#9 Kooky Statues: place a statue in a spot where people will delight in stumbling across it. 

Color Guide: How to Work With Red

Photo: American Cabinet & Flooring, Project Manager Randy Wilson

Sizzling or sedate, red is not for the timid. Here’s how to use its boldness to make your rooms come alive.

It’s the color of fire, love, passion and blood. In China it is associated with happiness. In Japan it is linked to heroism. In Western cultures it also hints at sex, deviance and shame. 

Whatever its associations, red is a powerful and beautiful color. True red is a primary color, but the spectrum of reds is vast, from pale pink (white with a little red in it) to scarlet, crimson and vermillion. In decorating, bright, vibrant reds are usually reserved for accents, while darker, browner reds end up on walls, floors, and doors. 

Its complementary partner is cyan, or turquoise blue, but it looks good with greens and all sorts of neutrals too, especially warm grays and whites. Red does well with a high gloss (think Chinese lacquer) and dramatic lighting. 

Red works in all sorts of decorating styles, from sleek modern to country cute, but it’s a dramatic color and to use it in a space is to make a statement. A red room is a fearless room.

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Brandom Cabinets on A&E Television "Sell This House Extreme"

See Brandom Cabinets on A&E Television’s

 – Sell This House: Extreme! – 

Airing on : August 11th & August 22nd, 2012
11:00 am EST
(Check local listings for showtimes)

Join in our support of these episodes of Sell This House: Extreme! Host Tanya Memme and construction expert Charlie Frattini join forces with new designer Daniel Kucan to create a triple tiered approach to extreme renovation featuring genuine Brandom Cabinets in an effort to help desperate homeowners prepare their difficult-to-sell spaces for today’s tough real estate market. The cabinets you will see in this episode were manufactured in Brandom’s Hillsboro, TX facility and feature the Lexington and Euro door styles and custom sizes. 

Check your local listings to check the episode numbers, channel, and times in your programming area of the country; as your local provider may vary programming for this show. 

August 11th – episode 013 – San Antonio
August 22nd – episode 014 – San Antonio

August 2012 Designer's Corner
Designer’s Corner

London: The Design Capital of the World

The summer Olympics isn’t the only event that will be attracting the world to visit London this year. The Ninth Annual London Design Festival will be held this September 17th – 25th. Events will take place throughout the city, with the Victoria & Albert museum of Decorative Arts and Design (The V & A) being the central hub of the festival, a natural home for an event which celebrates the best of design. The festival was set up to promote London as the design capital of the world and to celebrate the wealth of creative talent based there.

London is often looked at from around the world for fashion but interior design and architecture are also heavily influenced by the “London look.” One of the design trends that will most likely be displayed at this year’s design festival is “hyper-personalization“. The idea is to bring the unexpected in and to create a space where the room is not only a work of art, but created by you. By customizing each room to fit the specific needs of the person or persons that will occupy it, we are creating an uplifting attitude towards the home, giving each room its own personality and ambiance. Many of the current design trends today compliment this design idea. Some of the hottest London design trends to help you achieve “hyper-personalization” include:

  1. Using Darker Tones – in particular black to create focal points. Off set by using lighter colors, all the way down the spectrum to white, producing balance in the space. This creates opportunities to have fun with colorful decor without overstimulating the mind and creating uneasiness in the space. 
  2. Less is More! – to embrace as much space as possible people are trading their over-sized furniture pieces with small and more functional ones. Paired with thoughtful ways to create storage, a minimal approach gives more opportunity to utilize the space in a maximum way.
  3. Bold Colors & Bright Patterns – create focal points and personality in a room. Not only do bright colors make a room cheery, but it can be an easy and inexpensive way to give a room a make-over. By adding color and patterns in things like rugs, pillows, lamp shades, and art; you can achieve this design trend without remodeling your entire space.
  4. All White Furniture – though all white may sound boring, it is one of the most popular design trends today. A white piece of furniture can serve as a focal point to a colorful room or be a backdrop to something ornament that you wish to draw attention to. Again, you are causing contrast between light and bold colors, creating balance in the space. If white isn’t your thing, using light grays and browns should have similar affects. 
  5. Practicality – innovative ways to use space is the biggest goal in interior design. A room should not only be beautiful, but a space that you want to spend your time in. It’s all about using the space you have, to fit the life you want, no matter how big or small. 
The current trends are all about celebrating your personality, which will never go out of style. By taking care of details to make a room function specifically for the person that will occupy it – a pleasant, comfortable, and highly personal – interior design will be created. A room that celebrates personality is a beautifully functioning space, because it is from your perspective. So if you are looking for design ideas and trends, look at one of the world’s leaders in design – London; and come see me at American Cabinet & Flooring to get your remodel project started!
 
(Pictured Above: Moderner London kitchen expresses the all white furniture trend paired with colored accents – backsplash & fruit bowl – as focal points in this space.)
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