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10 Popular Home Design Trends | Timely or Timeless?

Weigh in on whether these of-the-moment decorating elements will have staying power or become a memory of these times.

It’s hard to know what’s going to stick and what’s going to go down in history as the next macramé plant holder. Interior design trends come and go and come again, to be sure.

In the ’50s, people ripped out Victorian details and claw-foot tubs in favor of vinyl and plastic and elements with the sleek, modern aesthetic of the atomic age. in the ’70s and ’80s, Danish modern pieces and other icons of the ’50s were eschewed as symbols of a stuffy, bygone era. Now they are sought-after treasures with giant price tags. 

In the last decade, we’ve seen some new decorating trends emerge. Some will have staying power, and some will go down with macramé plant hangers. We may see them in 20 years and think, “That is so 2012.” But which is which? I have my predications.

What are yours?

Moroccan Poufs

Image Source: Bungalow1a (blog)I am a huge fan of Moroccan poufs. They are great extra seating. They are great foot rests. They are both exotic and modern, and they come in a rainbow of colors.

They’re modern looking, but with just the right amount of flourish. Not too sleek, not too busy.

And they go with any decor:

  • Modern

  • Traditional

  • Boho

  • Eclectic

But are they here to stay? I’m not sure.

Woods Wallpaper

This beautiful and serene pattern hit its apex in about 2010, when it was absolutely everywhere.

It’s simple, symmetrical and classic.

But that may have been what whoever put up the wallpaper of cartoonish bathing ladies in my childhood bathroom thought.

Image Source: Piet Hein Eek Wood Wallpaper via Charlie and Caroline (blog)

Mid-Century Modern Wallpaper

Image Source: UltraswankI love wallpaper, and I love the big, graphic patterns inspired by mid-century designs. But they’ve already done their comeback circle and I’m betting that in a few more years they are going to fall out of favor again. 

In 1990 no one would have put this in their home. Now everyone is. What about in 2025?

Same goes for mid-century textured wallpaper. Trend.

Mid-Century Starburst Mirrors

A starburst mirror is to my mom what a salmon and seafoam room is to me: a design trend from my youth that now seems horribly misguided. She cannot imagine why anyone would want this in a home. 

But many, many people do want starburst mirrors in their homes. You see them in all sorts of different styles. Does that make them a classic or are they just enjoying one last moment of favor?

Image Source: Bright Bazaar (blog)

Mid-Century Everything

Image Source: Jay Johnson | Examiner Home DesignAll the mid-century design icons have made a huge resurgence in the past decade:

  • Eames

  • Saarinen

  • Nelson

  • Bertoia

You can’t turn around without hitting your shin on a Tulip Chair.

Mid-century modern design had real beauty and a very recognizable aesthetic. It is grounded in the philosophy of its time, which sought a sleek simplicity and an integration with the outdoors.

The ideas and designs of that time will never fade away. But the trend of creating a period-piece room will. We will always have Danish modern and Nelson lights, but I don’t think there will be quite so many rooms that look like Mad Men sets in 20 years.

Butterflies

Butterflies are the insect of choice for everything from little girls’ rooms to sophisticated dining rooms. In the early aughts it was birds; now it’s butterflies.

Nature never goes out of style, and we’ve been stealing its designs since we first wrote on cave walls. But will butterflies scream “2012” in five years? 

Image Source: Etsy via Aliette | The Hand Made Home (blog)

Old Globes

Image Source: Longwood Eduation (blog)These are another staple of modern, eclectic design. Just try to score a cheap out-of-date globe at a garage sale. There is no such thing, such is the demand. 

Old globes do have an innate loveliness. They are bright and round and colorful. They represent exploration and mystery.

But will the old globe’s current ubiquitousness be its undoing? Ten years from now, will you be able to score one at a garage sale for next to nothing?

Fake Taxidermy

This is another big one in eclectic modern design. It’s funny and winking and ironic – very much a product of the time. 

But animal heads fashioned out of cardboard, plaster and ceramic have a limited shelf life.

Image Source: Etsy via For Each Wind That Blows (blog)

‘For Like Ever’ Posters

Image Source: Style Files, Plush Palate, Coco & Kelley via CreamyLife (blog)Already dated. They were just too popular for their own good. 

It’s always possible that they will make a nostalgic comeback in 20 years when all the children of today recall them from their childhoods. But they will never be a classic.

Wall Decals

They are great for people who can’t or don’t want to commit to wallpaper. And they are certainly a lot less expensive than art. But does the wall decal mural have a future?

I think wall decals might be here to stay for short-life rooms like nurseries, but their best days are behind them for adult spaces. 

TopShop Newsletter | February 2013

TopShop News | February 2013

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American Cabinet & Flooring is NOW OPEN! in the Mission Trace Shopping Center at 120th & Colorado Blvd.

Mission Trace Showroom is Now Open!

We are very excited to announce that our NEW! American Cabinet & Flooring showroom is now open in the Mission Trace North Shopping Center in beautiful Thornton, CO.

Our team of Design Specialists are there and ready to get your remodel project started, come visit us today!

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American Cabinet & Flooring Design Specialist Clay Bernard named Houzz's 2013 Best of Remodeling Customer Satisfaction Winner

Houzz 2013 ‘Best of Remodeling’
Customer Satisfaction Winner


Clay Bernard


Congratulations to our Design Specialist, Clay Bernard, for being selected by the houzz.com community as a winner of the 2013 “Best of Houzzaward for Customer Satisfaction

This award is based on a variety of factors including ratings and reviews by Houzz’s 11 million monthly users.

About Clay Bernard
A Colorado native with over 15 years of construction and remodeling experience started his career early on working for his father’s company. After completing his studies at Metropolitan State University of Denver, Clayton moved into project management for Colorado Floorworks. Realizing his passion was in the design aspect of construction, Clayton became a Kitchen & Bath Designer for American Cabinet & Flooring where he has built an extensive portfolio and client base for over six years and looks to help build the brand for the future.
 Click here to read the full press release on Clay’s award.
American Cabinet & FLooring In-stock Merillat Cabinet Inventory, ready to take home today!
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Our in-stock Merillat Cabinet Collection features a clean, modern style with a traditional overlay door and a flat center panel design providing a straightforward choice that creates exceptional looks. All at a price point that makes this collection practical and extremely simple.

Elle Decor's "Big in 2013" | TopShop News

Elle Decor’s | BIG IN 2013

TREND: Lots of Brass

With its rich gleam and sculptural weight, this metal is experiencing a resurgence. With so many designers looking to the ’70s, it’s inevitable that brass and bronze will show up more – from accessories by Carl Aubock to cocktail tables by Gabriella Crespi to virtually entire rooms by Kelly Wearstler, brass is the metal of the moment.

TREND: Green

Pantone named Emerald the Color of the Year for 2013, but we’re seeing all shades of greens and expect more in the future, from bright spring greens to olives, and especially lots of different blue-greens and teal.

TREND: Embellished Walls

We expect this trend, already strong, to continue at full strength. The options now are limitless, from simple grass cloths to hand-painted papers to coverings embellished with glass beads and crystals. 

TREND: Lace

Your grandmother’s tablecloth is now hip. Already big on the runways, lace is showing up in the home collections of Zara and H&M, so you know it’s ready for its close-up. Count on seeing lots more see-through in the months ahead.

TREND: Beige

A surprise, but it’s showing up more often, and in quieter room settings. The danger here is going corporate bland, but very talented designers are using a variety of shades of cream, off-white, and yes; beige in a variety of textures to create serene settings. This could be the start of a backlash against all the vivid colors and layered rooms we’ve been seeing for the past few years. 

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Valentine’s Day is right around the corner and what better time to show your home some love with updated cabinetry, countertops, flooring and more from American Cabinet & Flooring!
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2013 “Best of Houzz” Design Specialist Clay Bernard

Houzz 2013 ‘Best of Remodeling’ Customer Satisfaction Winner

Design Specialist Clay Bernard | 2013 Best of Houzz

We are very pleased and excited to announce that American Cabinet & Flooring Design Specialist, Clay Bernard, has been selected by the houzz.com community as a winner of the 2013 “Best of Houzz” awards for “Customer Satisfaction”. This award is based on a variety of factors including ratings and reviews by Houzz’s 11 million monthly users.

Houzz is the leading online platform for residential remodeling and design; a homeowner to homeowner guide to the top architects, interior designers, contractors and other residential remodeling professionals in the U.S. and around the world. 

The Best of Remodeling award is given in two categories: Customer Satisfaction and Design. Customer Satisfaction award winners, like Clay, are based on homeowner members who rated their experience working with remodelers and designers in categories ranging from landscape contractors to kitchen and bath designers

About Clay Bernard

A Colorado native with over 15 years of construction and remodeling experience started his career early on working for his father’s company. After completing his studies at Metropolitan State University of Denver, Clayton moved into project management for Colorado Floorworks. Realizing his passion was in the design aspect of construction, Clayton became a Kitchen & Bath Designer for American Cabinet & Flooring where he has built an extensive portfolio and client base for over six years and looks to help build the brand for the future.

Read the full press release on Clay’s Award here.

2013 “Best of Houzz” | American Cabinet & Flooring Design Specialist ** Clay Bernard **

Houzz 2013 ‘Best of Remodeling’ Customer Satisfaction Winner

Design Specialist Clay Bernard | 2013 Best of Houzz

We are very pleased and excited to announce that American Cabinet & Flooring Design Specialist, Clay Bernard, has been selected by the houzz.com community as a winner of the 2013 “Best of Houzz” awards for “Customer Satisfaction”. This award is based on a variety of factors including ratings and reviews by Houzz’s 11 million monthly users.

Houzz is the leading online platform for residential remodeling and design; a homeowner to homeowner guide to the top architects, interior designers, contractors and other residential remodeling professionals in the U.S. and around the world. 

The Best of Remodeling award is given in two categories: Customer Satisfaction and Design. Customer Satisfaction award winners, like Clay, are based on homeowner members who rated their experience working with remodelers and designers in categories ranging from landscape contractors to kitchen and bath designers

About Clay Bernard

A Colorado native with over 15 years of construction and remodeling experience started his career early on working for his father’s company. After completing his studies at Metropolitan State University of Denver, Clayton moved into project management for Colorado Floorworks. Realizing his passion was in the design aspect of construction, Clayton became a Kitchen & Bath Designer for American Cabinet & Flooring where he has built an extensive portfolio and client base for over six years and looks to help build the brand for the future.

Read the full press release on Clay’s Award here.

 

Click here to start following American Cabinet & Flooring on Houzz   |   Click here to start following Clay Bernard on HouzzSave & Close

20 Holiday Essentials to Get You to New Year’s

No matter how much we prepare for the holidays, something usually slips through the cracks. And without fail, it goes unnoticed until the exact moment we need it. Avoid last-minute scrambles this year by stocking up on these essentials.

Photo: Houzz.com

1). Brown kraft paper can be used for wrapping gifts, covering up the kids’ (or adults’) table, making place settings, as a table runner or for gift tags.

2). Colorful tape makes any wrapping job more fun. Stock up for birthdays while you’re at it.

3). Twine in cheerful colors can be used for wrapping pretty presents and packages, tying tags, hanging decor and more.

4). A gold pen can be used to dress up brown kraft paper and colored gift tags or make a thank-you note look extra special.

5). Scissors. Consider buying a colorful pair for extra holiday cheer.

6). A hole punch and colored paper to make gift tags and confetti (at the same time!).

7). White twinkle lights can make any room look festive. Keep these on hand for quick decor.

8). Candles in all all shapes and sizes should be on hand. Stock up on scented candles for the bathrooms, decorative candles and votives for table settings, and Hanukkah candles for those eight special nights.

9). Matches should be ready for all those candles, a cozy fire and maybe a New Year’s Eve sparkler or two.

10). Cloth napkins make even impromptu meals feel formal, and can take the wear and tear that comes with heavy holiday meals.

11). A serving tray will present your annual holiday cheese ball in style.

12). Tide pens will take care of those inevitable red wine and gravy spills.

13). A bottle opener. Don’t be the host who has to run to the store 15 minutes before the midnight toast!

14). Coasters strategically placed on every table will encourage guests to protect your furniture. 

15). DIY drink tags in holiday colors help your guest keep track of their glasses. Just trace the bottom of a wineglass on a piece of paper and trace a dime in the center. Cut both circles out with a slit between and use your gold pen to label each one.

16). A doormat in a bright color can help remind guests to wipe their shoes before coming in.

17). Thank-you cards. A handwritten note is a great way to show family and friends your appreciation.

18). Holiday stamps announce the arrival of a special invitation or note before the envelope has even been opened.

19). Cleaning supplies will take care of any pre- and post party messes.

20). Whether you’re sore from late-night dancing or have a headache from too many Christmas carols, you’ll want to keep a big bottle of ibuprofen around this holiday season.

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20 Holiday Essentials to Get You to New Year’s

Can You Live a Full Life in 220 Square Feet?

Adjusting mind-sets along with furniture may be the key to happiness for tiny-home dwellers.

Tiny homes pose a dilemma: How can you make a pocket-size space comfortable and stylish? The issue has special relevance in San Francisco right now, as the Board of Supervisors gears up for a November 2012 vote on a proposal to allow the construction of microunits as small as 220 square feet.

Small-space living can be an economical choice, but it’s also a lifestyle choice, says Felice Cohen, who has lived in a 90-square-foot apartment in Manhattan for almost five years. “If you adjust your thinking on what is ‘enough’, you’ll find that you’ll enjoy having the city as your backyard,” she says.

Here, professionals share strategies on how you can live a full life in the tiniest of space. 


EVillageStudio_06.jpg

Photo: JPDA | Michael Pozner’s East Village Studio | New York

Look for Opportunities to Customize

JPDA Creative Director Darrick Borowski applauds density and supports living on a smaller footprint. “I don’t think the microunits necessarily have to equate to a reduction of living standards,” he says. “It can certainly lead to that, but it doesn’t have to. Although the skeptic in me is concerned how these units will benefit landowners and people with money, another part of me looks at this as an opportunity to create small homes that are bespoke and reflect the way people are living in cities like San Francisco.”


Axon_1.jpg

Photo: JPDA | Michael Pozner’s Studio

Borowski points to Michael Pozner’s studio, at almost 500 square feet, is a great example of a space with hardworking multiuse and disappearing furnishings. “His desk space determined so much of the design around it and really reflected the client’s needs,” he says. “He worked there, had meetings there, but its professional function could also disappear, and the space could turn into an entertainment center, a bar for food and drinks.”

These graphics (below) illustrate how Borowski might custom design a 220-square-foot microunit for a client. “We distill our client’s basic functions – the eat, sleep, cook, entertaining graph – into a clear priority set and turn the priorities into space requirements – the second/middle graph,” he says. “The third graph investigates the overlaps and inevitably informs the design.”

Borowski thinks that what’s not shown on the plan is equally important: public or communal space. “The microunits should include a public or communal space allotment,” he says. “For example, they could be in buildings with an interior courtyard or a garden. [The city of San Francisco] can make this work and enable people to really wrap their heads around living in 220 square feet by building units within a three-to five-minute walk to a park. 


220sqftillus.jpg

Photo: JPDA

Felice Cohen, who has since moved from her 90-square-foot unit into a 500-square-foot apartment just two blocks away from her old home, thinks that microunits and tiny homes in general enable people like herself to achieve their goals.

“Microunit living can actually contribute to a better quality of life if your qualifty of life isn’t rooted in what’s inside your apartment, and if you know that you won’t be in the same space forever. The city was and still is my backyard: I go to shows and meet friends at restaurants instead of staying at home watching TV on the couch,” she says.

Cohen is quick to point out that there isn’t anything wrong with staying home and watching TV, but that microunit living forced her to “find a reason to get up and go,” she says. 

Build Up

Architect, writer and Houzz contributor John Hill has a few years of tiny-space living experience. “I lived in a 200-square-foot efficiency, which means that it didn’t have a separate kitchen; it was located on one wall of the main space. My friends use to say that I could cook breakfast without getting out of bed – which was almost true,” he says.


220sqftdia.jpg

Hill suggests putting storage up high and keeping closets and other service parts away from the windows of the apartment, to make the space as open as possible. “For 220 square feet, I think a loft bed would work better than something like a sleeper sofa, so the space underneath [the loft] can be used for a desk/study or a TV or a dressing area,” he says. 

Hill, who drew the plans for a 220-square-foot space shown here, says that a rolling ladder is essential for the scenario to work. He added a planter box to the window in the kitchen for growing herbs and other plants, lending the space some indoor greenery and giving the microunit dwellers access to some homegrown food without depending on the availability of a garden rooftop.

Interior designer Leslie Banker designed a tiny bedroom for a client in which the desktop was on a hinge, just like on a ship. “When the client worked, she pulled the desk up, and when the desk wasn’t it use, she folded it down. She has a small stool to sit on when she uses the desktop, so it tucks away easily,” Banker says.

She adds that high ceilings and at least two windows would let in plenty of natural light and give access to a view – preferably an attractive one. “The windows and the view help bring your attention beyond the interior space, which can improve your comfort when living in a tiny, tiny space,” she says.

Think Differently

Not everyone is built for microunit living. Cohen says that living in a tiny space requires a kind of discipline and self-awareness that living in a larger home may not foster. “You have to know your priorities, and you must downsize significantly before making the move,” she says. “But living in a 90-square-foot apartment let me live comfortably, travel, write a book and eventually buy my own apartment in Manhattan – which is something that is really difficult to do nowadays.”

Cohen says that she began and finished packing up her tiny unit on the same day of her big move – just two blocks away from her tiny home. “I remember looking at my upsized 500-square-foot apartment and thinking, ‘Wow, there are all these closets and I don’t have that much stuff.’ The place felt humongous,” she says.


220sqft1.png

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Rocky Mountain Gardener’s October Checklist


oct garden.JPG

Photo: Bev’s Colorado GardenOctober is the beautiful bridge month between autumn and winter. The days are noticeably shorter, bright and cool. October is a busy month in the garden, the time to prepare for the harsh cold and snow of winter while enjoying every moment you can spend outdoors.

Winterize Water Features

The freeze-and-thaw cycle of winter weather can wreak havoc on these valuable garden assets. To minimize the damage:

  1. Drain, clean and store or cover freestanding fountains and water pots.

  2. Remove plant debris from ponds and set up a bubbler (a submersible pump with a short piece of pipe attached to the outlet) to keep some of the water surface free of ice.

  3. Disconnect pumps to recirculating waterfalls, especially if the water volume is fairly low. Ice buildup can divert water and cause problems. Moving water will also make your pond colder, which may be an issue if you have fish.

Prepare for Snow

If you haven’t had frost or snow yet, you will soon. Early snow tends to be heavy and wet, and can damage plant – especially those that haven’t shed their leaves yet. Keep a broom handy and be ready to sweep snow away to lighten the load on tree and shrub branches.

Winterize Your Watering System

Frozen pipes or components can be costly and inconvenient to repair. To prevent this:

  1. Drain your irrigation system and insulate the backflow preventer.

  2. Remove hoses from faucets and drain them. Store hoses and sprinklers in a handy location for winter watering.

Remove Leaves From Lawn Areas

Leaves left on lawn areas will compact under the snow, smothering the lawn and contributing to disease problems like snow mold.

  • Use leaves whole or shred them with your lawnmower or a commercial shredder.

  • Add them to your compost pile now or stockpile them for future use.

  • Use leaves as mulch, 4 to 6 inches deep. Apply now to new planting areas to maintain soil warmth and permit better root growth, apply to bare soil areas to prevent erosion, or apply after the ground has frozen to prevent frost heave and premature soil warming in spring.

  • Keep leaf mulch 6 inches away from the bases of trees and shrubs to prevent damage from rodents.

It’s important to remove any diseased foliage from the garden completely – don’t compost it.

Amend the Soil

Planning to install a new vegetable or flower garden next spring? Now is a great time to prepare the soil. Use organic amendments to increase water-and nutrient-holding capacity and to improve aeration and water flow. Adding amendments now allows you to work in the garden while the soil is relatively dry, thus preventing the potential for soil compaction that can occur if you try to do it during the wet months of early spring. Come springtime the soil will be ready to plant:

  • Amendments must be mixed well into the soil – spade or rototill to a depth of 6 to 8 inches.

  • Composts and aged manures work best for sandy soils; sphagnum peat or wood chips are ideal for clay.

  • Incorporate 3 cubic yards of amendment per 1,000 square feet of soil. That’s about 8 cubic feet of amendment for a 10-foot by 10-foot area of soil.

  • Mulch the bed with a couple of inches of leaves or shredded wood to help prevent soil erosion during the winter.

Enjoy Puttering

Pull weeds and spent annuals, plant bulbs and harvest herbs and cool-season veggie for hearty meals. Most of all, spend time with family and friends surrounds by nature’s October glow!

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Kitchen Counters High-Tech Surfaces Make Maintenance Easy

Solid-surface countertops are the stuff of George Jetson, in which high-tech plastics can be heat sculpted into any imagined shape. These modern surfaces take on many appearances, including stone, yet shed the shortcomings of their counterparts with a nonporous surface that doesn’t age or develop a patina. In this cutting-edge countertop right for your kitchen? Read on to learn more.

Photo: Wilsonart Solid Surface in BedrockThe basics: solid-surface counters are a blend of acrylic or polyester resins, powdered fillers and pigments, cast into slab. There are many manufacturers of these synthetic counters, including Dupont Corian, LG Hi-Macs, Wilsonart, Formica, Durat, Staron and LivingStone.

Cost: $50 to $100 per square foot installed.

Advantages: solid surface is durable nonporous, making it resistant to stains, mildew and bacteria. Its unique composition makes buffing out scratches a breeze and provides that appearance of a seamless installation, including for integral backsplashes. This product outshines its competitors with an ability to be thermoformed into unusual shapes and configurations.

Disadvantages: its resin-based composition makes this counter material sensitive to heat and vulnerable to scratches. As with many countertops, keep your trivets and cutting boards handy.

Sustainability: many solid-surface manufacturers tout GreenGuard‘s approval, which certifies that due to the nonporous surface and low chemical emissions, the countertop contributes to healthy indoor air quality.

The ecological shortcoming of these products is their composition, which comes from finite, nonrenewable resources, including petroleum and aluminum trihydrate (ATH), which is strip mined. Choosing a solid-surface product with recycled content, like Durat or Corian’s Terra series, will reduce the negative environmental impact.

Maintenance: soapy water will suffice for everyday spiffing up of this easy-to-clean surface. However, it’s essential to dry the surface completely after cleaning or spills, as wet counters can lead to a dull or uneven, blotchy finish.

Special considerations: acrylic solid surface is more pliable, whereas its polyester-based counterparts claim a deeper coloration. Dark colors will show more fingerprints.

Kitchen Counters | High-Tech Solid Surfaces Make Maintenance Easy

Solid-surface countertops are the stuff of George Jetson, in which high-tech plastics can be heat sculpted into any imagined shape. These modern surfaces take on many appearances, including stone, yet shed the shortcomings of their counterparts with a nonporous surface that doesn’t age or develop a patina. In this cutting-edge countertop right for your kitchen? Read on to learn more.

Photo: Wilsonart Solid Surface in BedrockThe basics: solid-surface counters are a blend of acrylic or polyester resins, powdered fillers and pigments, cast into slab. There are many manufacturers of these synthetic counters, including Dupont Corian, LG Hi-Macs, Wilsonart, Formica, Durat, Staron and LivingStone.

Cost: $50 to $100 per square foot installed.

Advantages: solid surface is durable nonporous, making it resistant to stains, mildew and bacteria. Its unique composition makes buffing out scratches a breeze and provides that appearance of a seamless installation, including for integral backsplashes. This product outshines its competitors with an ability to be thermoformed into unusual shapes and configurations.

Disadvantages: its resin-based composition makes this counter material sensitive to heat and vulnerable to scratches. As with many countertops, keep your trivets and cutting boards handy.

Sustainability: many solid-surface manufacturers tout GreenGuard‘s approval, which certifies that due to the nonporous surface and low chemical emissions, the countertop contributes to healthy indoor air quality.

The ecological shortcoming of these products is their composition, which comes from finite, nonrenewable resources, including petroleum and aluminum trihydrate (ATH), which is strip mined. Choosing a solid-surface product with recycled content, like Durat or Corian’s Terra series, will reduce the negative environmental impact.

Maintenance: soapy water will suffice for everyday spiffing up of this easy-to-clean surface. However, it’s essential to dry the surface completely after cleaning or spills, as wet counters can lead to a dull or uneven, blotchy finish.

Special considerations: acrylic solid surface is more pliable, whereas its polyester-based counterparts claim a deeper coloration. Dark colors will show more fingerprints.

The Four Things Home Buyers Really Want in Kitchen Cabinetry

A great kitchen design can dramatically increase your property value – if you want to attract prospective buyers, your kitchen  is the perfect place to invest money. The trick is to get it to appeal to the majority of people by spending your money on what most of them really want.

Kitchen cabinetry can do much to attract the right buyers. There are four key factors to consider:

  1. QualityPhoto: American Cabinet & Flooring

  2. Symmetry

  3. Color

  4. Layout

If you can get these key elements right with your cabinetry, you’re bound to have a higher home value.

Quality

The number of cabinets you have is not as important as the quality of the cabinetry. The fewer cabinets you add to your kitchen renovation, the less expensive it will be. Choose quality over quantity.

DO: choose quality hinges and runners, including soft-close drawers and custom made cabinetry.

DON’T: go for large fillers and ill-fitted modular cabinetry.

Keep the cost down by keeping the cabinet count down. Design the kitchen layout to keep it light, bright and with an open plan, without using tons of cabinets. 

Note: Excessive internal organizers aren’t essential if you are planning on reselling your home. They are wonderful in adding value to your personal use of the kitchen but are not always a wise choice if you are renovating purely to sell. Internal drawer and cabinet fit-outs are often expensive, and the extra money you spend on these accessories may not come back to you when you’re selling your property.

Symmetry

The eye is naturally drawn to appreciate symmetry and repetition. When you’re renovating to sell, keep your kitchen cabinetry simple and appealing. Elegance has a way of being understated, and simplicity is key when you are trying to appeal to the majority of buyers.

DO: keep the wall cabinetry sizes the same where possible. Drawers look nice when they are large and expansive – if you have multiple sets, keep them the same size, with the same proportion of drawers.

DON’T: add multiple cabinets in varying sizes, try to keep the look and feel consistent in the whole space.

Light, Bright Spaces

Many buyers want an open, light and airy space. A kitchen that is white makes the space feel bigger. White is also a universally appealing color and leaves a blank slate so buyers can re-envision the space.

DO: keep the space open, bright and light with white cabinetry. If you want some contrast, go for a darker bench top. Backsplahes should be kept fairly neutral too – try to introduce texture instead of color into the backsplash. The more neutral and elegant the space is, the more potential buyers you will attract.

DON’T: use darker-color cabinetry which can make the space feel closed. While adding a strong color may suit your taste, it may not be to everybody’s liking. You want to attract as many potential buyers as possible, and while white may not be the most daring color for your cabinetry, it’s the most popular. 

An Open Layout

Designing your kitchen to have a sensible and open layout is pivotal to increasing property value when you’re renovating to sell. The trend is moving toward open-plan living and multifunctional spaces. 

DO: have a large open-plan space with a kitchen island if possible. Buyers often want to multi-task in the kitchen. They want to cook, have their kids do their homework and socialize in it.

DON’T: place your kitchen in a small and poky room, the kitchen is now often the hub of the house and buyers want to see a kitchen that is interactive and sociable.