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8 Top Hardware Styles for Shaker Kitchen Cabinets

Article By: Rebekah Zaveloff

Shaker-style cabinet doors are so flexible stylewise that they can go either traditional or modern depending on what you pair them with. Decorative elements like lighting, tile and hardware can really change the tone and overall style of a kitchen. Cabinet hardware is often referred to as the jewelry of a kitchen, and just like with an outfit, it can really alter the overall look of your space. 

1. Traditional Nickel or Steel Knobs and Bin Pulls

Shaker cabinets are known for their simple, clean lines, and often you’ll see them paired with simple, unadorned cabinet hardware. Whether your style is vintage or modern, you’ll find that a Shaker door is one of the most versatile doors styles available. A vintage-style kitchen with white Shaker cabinets is often seen finished with a combination of timeless cup or bin pulls and knobs.

Traditionally you’ll see knobs on doors and bin pulls on drawers. For drawers 30 inches and wider, two bin pulls are often used.

What they do for the kitchen: Add retro flair.

What they work well with: Inset cabinetry with exposed hinges, stainless steel, white marble and honed black countertops, industrial-style lighting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On vintage bin pulls, the face screws are functional; on reproductions the face screws may be faux, with the pull attached through the back.

2. Vintage Glass or Ceramic Knobs

Vintage-style glass, also referred to as Depression Era glass, is another classic hardware choice for Shaker cabinets. With a stained cabinet finish, it’s nice to create some contrast with the hardware by using a white glass knob. 

Putting knobs on drawers is a great vintage touch, though pulls are more user friendly for everyday use. 

This type of knob comes with and without a face screw, as well as in a variety of colors, transparent and opaque, as well as clear. 

What they do for the kitchen: Create a historical feel that can go Victorian, Arts and Crafts or colonial revival.

What they work well with: Glass-front hutch cabinets, stained wood cabinets, butler’s pantry or scullery-style cabinets, subway tile, black and white kitchens.

 

3. Vintage Pulls With Exposed Screws

This type of hardware is reminiscent of vintage double-hung window hardware and can add a great vintage or industrial touch to a new kitchen. It looks completely different in a nickel finish than in oil-rubbed bronze or antique brass. 

Antique Brass Aubrey Pull – $10 »
I love the authenticity of this pull with the exposed screws, and it comes in a bunch of finishes and sizes, so it can work in lots of different applications. I’m quite partial to antique brass these days, especially on darker cabinets, and I love the high contrast of oil-rubbed bronze on white cabinets. 

What they do for the kitchen: Add a utilitarian and industrial feel.

What they work well with: Other humble and hardworking materials, such as subway tile, stainless steel countertops, commercial-style appliancesfarm sinks and industrial-style lighting.
4. Tubular Bar Pulls
A traditional-style kitchen with Shaker cabinets gets a modern touch with nickel or stainless steel tubular bar pulls. This type of hardware is often seen on slab or flat-panel doors, but it works equally well on a Shaker-style door. Tubular bar pulls can be long and dramatic or short and classic.

Laurey Stainless Steel Melrose Bar Cabinet Pull – $12 »
Tubular bar pulls are sometimes referred to as barrel pulls and are offered by almost every hardware company. They come in a variety of sizes and finishes, making them a great choice if you’re looking to add modern flair to your Shaker-style kitchen cabinets. 

What they do for the kitchen: Modernize it

What they work well with: Long and skinny mosaic tiles, oversize and rectangular tiles,ebony or espresso stained Shaker cabinets, modern pendant lighting.
5. Flat Bar Pulls
In this kitchen, the hardware’s accentuated length and polished nickel finish add a little modern glamour. In the same way a font choice affects the look of a logo, the decorative hardware of a kitchen can transform the overall experience of the space.
Italian Designs Classic Pull – $15.95 »
Flat bar pulls come in multiple lengths and finishes, from sleek stainless steel to hand-forged white bronze. 

What they do for the kitchen: Add a contemporary edge.

What they work well with: White or dark Shaker cabinets, square-edged stone or concrete countertops, full-height glass backsplashes, oversize rectangular tile in a stacked pattern

Flat bar pulls are a terrific way to modernize a Shaker-style cabinet, complementing it with a linear and squared-off look. As you can see, when run vertically and horizontally, the hardware really creates a focal point in the kitchen.

6. Accented Wire Pulls

This kitchen leans more traditional, with tall crown molding, a decorative hood surround and a bronze faucet, but the cabinet doors are still classic Shaker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antique Pewter Cabinet Pulls – $5.19 »
These pulls go by different names, but they’re basically wire pulls with decorative details. 

What they do for the kitchen: Allow you to add more decorative moldings and traditional elements.

What they work well with: Traditional elements like plate racks, crown molding, bronze accents and decorative hood surrounds.

7. Arced and Footed Bar Pulls

For a more classic look, there are arced and footed pulls. These go by many different names and can also fall into the wire-pull category. These pulls are traditional and just decorative enough without being too fussy for a Shaker door. Mixing finishes on dark and light cabinets helps to create contrast on each and keeps the kitchen from feeling stale.

What they do for the kitchen: Add a more traditional and decorative element.

What they work well with: Stone mosaic tile backsplashes, nickel diamond-mesh cabinet inserts, marble countertops with a decorative ogee edge. 

Go Ahead: Mix Your Finishes
When people say all white kitchens look alike, I can’t disagree more. Just changing the finish of the hardware completely changes the look of a kitchen, even when the hardware is exactly the same style.

Depending on the other finishes in your kitchen, you may consider satin nickel, polished chrome or nickel, or oil-rubbed bronze. Don’t feel like you have to match the cabinet hardware to the lighting or plumbing fixture finishes. I like to mix finishes by using antique brass light fixtures and polished nickel pulls to give a kitchen a more collected-over-time feel.

When using two or more cabinet finishes, as with the stained island and white perimeter cabinets shown in this kitchen, it’s perfectly fine to mix up the finishes of the hardware as well! Not everything has to match — the nickel finish wouldn’t look as good on the stained island as the antique bronze finish does, for example.

 

Easy Kitchen Updates for a Lazy Weekend

Have you ever had a moment of staring at your space, feeling all kinds of antsy and knowing that something has to change? It might be the wall color that you never liked anyway or that storage issue that is driving you batty. All you know is that in order to continue living in your house, you must embrace that urge to change something!

I often get the urge when I look at my kitchen. No matter how awesome it looks so far, there is always room for improvement. If you have kitchen restlessness like me, here are a few great ideas that you can implement in a weekend. They will make you feel much happier about the way your kitchen looks – for awhile anyway.

Paint Something


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Photo Credit: Build Direct BlogEveryone knows that a fresh coat of paint can make a room look like new. But did you ever think about painting not just the wall, but anything else that takes well to a paintbrush. Put chalkboard paint on the front of your refrigerator (assuming it’s no longer under warranty), paint your cabinets or create a new backsplash with designs painted directly onto stick-on tiles.

Add in a New Material

Painting is one thing, but an entirely new material is another. Spruce up that boring ceiling with beadboard panels, painted a lighter shade than your walls. Into something more intricate? Try tin ceiling tiles for a much more traditional look. If you don’t want to go that far, consider simple new molding in a contrasting color. 

Get Rid of the Doors

Cabinet doors are nice, but it might be even nicer to remove them. If you have a great collection of china or colorful pots and pans, getting rid of the cabinet doors can allow your creativity to shine in new ways. This can also force you to do some spring cleaning on your cabinets, and who doesn’t  need a bit of that?

Light Things Up!


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Photo Credit: Build Direct Blog

Sometimes the kitchen can seem dreary, especially if the summer sunlight is shining through the windows. Brighter lights, lights that highlight certain areas of the kitchen and fixtures that make a sunny statement are all good options for chasing away the shadows – and the doldrums.

Change the Hardware

It might be a small thing, but it has a big impact. Changing the hardware on your kitchen cabinets and drawers can be as easy as looking at a home improvement store, estate sale or speciality boutique. Choose something that suits your cabinet style but adds a pop of color to your space. It can be done in an afternoon with little cost, and can brighten up the space and your mood.

Get Some New Furniture

Are you tired of that little space beside the fridge? How about that old desk that has seen better days, the one that you parked beside the counter for a place to catch the mail? Plenty of kitchens have furniture, and you can spruce things up with a gorgeous piece of furniture that seems as though it wasn’t meant for a kitchen. For instance, a big bookcase to hold all those cookbooks and lovely dishes can make a nice new attraction for the eyes. 

Plant Something


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Finally, bring the outside in with a tiny herb garden. Colorful pots that line your windowsill can play host to such delicacies as sage, parsley, chives and rosemary. Depending upon your climate, you could even include a few dwarf trees or plants, such as a Meyer lemon.

You don’t have to spend a fortune to make your kitchen look like a million bucks. All you have to do is take a weekend, invest a small bit of money and elbow grease, then step back and admire your new place to cook and entertain.

(You are reading an article orignally posted on Build Direct Blog)