Reclaimed Siding and Red Accents Personalize a White Kitchen

By Camille LeFevre


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Photos by Brandon Stengel

Kitchen at a Glance
Who lives here: A couple with two teenagers
Location: St. Louis Park, Minnesota
Size: About 450 square feet (41.8 square meters)
Designers: Tamatha Miller and Timothy Ferraro of Bluestem Construction

In a busy household with two teenagers, the former kitchen was a natural gathering spot for family and friends, but it was feeling cramped. To make more space, designers Tamatha Miller and Timothy Ferraro removed the wall between the kitchen and the adjacent breakfast room. Access to the backyard was also important, so a new doorway off the eating area leads to the patio and grilling area.


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The homeowners already had the red dining chairs, and they requested a neutral color palette to make the red stand out. “The mother is a seasonal decorator, and the red really works throughout the seasons, as she decorates for all of the holidays,” Miller says. The custom cabinets are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Simply White. The countertops are a mix of two Caesarstone products: white for the island, and black for the outer countertops and built-in desk. The wood flooring is new and is narrow-strip red oak. A farmhouse sink and stainless drawer pulls complete the look.


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“They wanted the feeling of an open kitchen but with character,” Ferraro says. “So we created the dark accents by utilizing some of the house’s old shiplap sheathing for the island, computer nook and mudroom wall.” 

The salvaged sheathing had served as insulation under the home’s previous exterior siding. When the exterior received new siding and insulation, some of the sheathing was saved to be used in the kitchen. The recycled wood was treated with a four-step stain process: deep purple, then a dry brush of warm gray, followed by a dry brush of soft white and ending with a final dry brush.

To free up counter space, the new island features a built-in microwave. The industrial-style pendants above the island and the light fixture above the dining table complement the reclaimed wood.


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By adding a built-in desk in the kitchen, the parents can monitor their teens’ computer use and searches without hovering over their shoulders. “This was our way of bringing the computer out of the kids’ bedrooms and into a public space,” Ferraro says. The built-in desk is counter height, and the same industrial-style stools were chosen for the island and the desk.


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The newly remodeled mudroom adjacent to the kitchen features the same reclaimed shiplap sheathing as in the kitchen. It covers the back wall of the custom built-in bench with coat hooks.

The Best Colors for Your Spring Redesign

You probably already know that certain colors make you feel certain ways. For instance, you might adore purple and absolutely hate yellow, or you might be attracted to every shade of green under the sun. But did you know that colors truly can affect how we think and feel? Before you reach for that paint swatch and make a commitment to a certain color in your home, make sure you know what each color might mean for your mood, appetite and even your metabolism. 

The color you choose to brush on your walls can have a major effect on your everyday life. You want to create something that not only reflects the way you love to feel, but also conveys what you believe in and dream about. So without further ado, here are some of the most popular colors and what they really mean.

Red


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Photo Credit: Eclectic Dinig Room by Boston Interior Designer (m) + charles beach INTERIORS

Everything from deep red to cherry fire-engine red can be appealing, but keep in mind that red is know to boost appetite. This makes it a perfect option for the dining room or kitchen. In fact think about some of the biggest fast food-restaurants – what color is their signage? Most of them have at least a touch of red. But avoid putting red in your office, because it has also been shown to cut down on the effectiveness of studying. 

Blue


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Photo Credit: Modern Home Office by Chicago Photographer Cynthia Lynn PhotographyFeeling blue? Then you might be very productive! Blue is known for curbing appetite and keeping production levels high, so put it in your office. It is also great for calmness and serenity, as well as being a favorite color for men, so blue accents in the man cave might be an excellent idea.

Green


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Photo Credit: Traditional Hall by Weston Architect Oak Hill ArchitetThis color mimics nature, so is it any wonder that it brings to mind good health and tranquility? Turn to green for your bedroom, reading room or anywhere else that you want to relax. Green is also an excellent color for those who have a strong affinity for nature, for obvious reasons.

Yellow


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Photo Credit: Traditional Living Room by Wooster General Contractor Weaver Custom HomesThis cheerful, warm color is a popular one for nurseries, but unfortunately, it has been shown to make babies cry. Keep the peace by keeping yellow in your kitchen, mudroom or sunroom. Yellow can give you more energy and even boost your metabolism.

White


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Photo Credit: Traditional Entry by Los Angeles Artist & Artisan Blue Tangerine ArtIf you want to create the illusion of space, white is the way to go. This innocent, pure color creates the perfect backdrop for any kind of decor and keeps the room airy at the same time. Pair white with a big mirror for big impact.

Brown


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Photo Credit: Traditional Home Office by Charlotte Interior Designer Carolina Design Associates, LLCThose who choose brown are practical, careful people. Put this in your office, living room or use it as an accent color. However, be sure to spice it up with a containing color; brown can also mean “boring” if you use too much of it.

Other Colors to Consider

What about colors that are a bit off the beaten path? Experts have plenty to say about that, too.

  • Pink is a feminine color that makes people feel safe and happy.

  • Purple brings to mind royalty and wealth; in fact, many kings throughout history have worn purple robes, the sign of power.

  • Orange gets attention and conveys excitement and enthusiasm, so use it in a room where busy people are, such as the playroom for the kids.

Finally, keep in mind that black conveys exactly what you probably think; death, mourning and darkness. Black can make a great accent or furniture color, but you might want to steer clear from putting it on your walls, as it can also make a room look smaller.

Now that you know, what color will you choose for your springtime design?

(You are reading an article originally posted on Build Direct Blog.)

Color Guide: How to Work With Red

Photo: American Cabinet & Flooring, Project Manager Randy Wilson

Sizzling or sedate, red is not for the timid. Here’s how to use its boldness to make your rooms come alive.

It’s the color of fire, love, passion and blood. In China it is associated with happiness. In Japan it is linked to heroism. In Western cultures it also hints at sex, deviance and shame. 

Whatever its associations, red is a powerful and beautiful color. True red is a primary color, but the spectrum of reds is vast, from pale pink (white with a little red in it) to scarlet, crimson and vermillion. In decorating, bright, vibrant reds are usually reserved for accents, while darker, browner reds end up on walls, floors, and doors. 

Its complementary partner is cyan, or turquoise blue, but it looks good with greens and all sorts of neutrals too, especially warm grays and whites. Red does well with a high gloss (think Chinese lacquer) and dramatic lighting. 

Red works in all sorts of decorating styles, from sleek modern to country cute, but it’s a dramatic color and to use it in a space is to make a statement. A red room is a fearless room.

July 2012 Designer’s Corner

Design & Planning – Kitchen

2012 Color Trends and A Few Fun Color Facts


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Every year, Sherwin-Williams releases its forecast of color trends and what paint colors they think will make their way into homes this year. Here’s a quick description of each color palette in the four earthy color groups (reds, blues, greens and neutrals), as well as a few fun color facts.

REDS

Sherwin-Williams says reds will be seen in many shades, specifically flowery tones such as fuchsias, red-oranges, violets and delicate pinks.

Fun Fact: In the world of feng shui, a red front door invites prosperity into the residents.

BLUES

Celebrating a pair of treasured blues – denim and water – blue is a soothing palette that adds a sense of calmness and serenity to rooms.

Fun Fact: The color blue is the least common color in the foods we eat.

GREENS

Greens from years past have incorporated a yellow tint. This year focuses on a more eclectic palette, according to Sherwin-Williams, including lush, moody, complex greens that showcase deeper aspects of the sea and forest.

Fun Fact: Night goggles use the color green because the human eye is most sensitive to green and able to discern the most shades of it.

NEUTRALS

Subtle hues found in raw materials act as inspiration for 2012 colors. Imagine field of grain, a pile of pebbles, weathered wood and earthern clay. The neutral palette is a warm, understated palette made up of soft yellows and browns that won’t overpower a room.

Fun Fact: Dreaming of the color brown means you will be lucky with money.